ECG Guru - Instructor Resources

A gathering place for instructors of ECG and cardiac topics.

       

Subscribe to me on YouTube

Featured App

Welcome To The ECG GURU

SINCE 2011, the ECG GURU has been devoted to providing resources for ECG teachers and their students. Follow the links above or the search terms to the left to find what you are looking for.  

Download ECGs, Illustrations, and other Resources For Your Classes!
Everything on the ECG GURU is free and free of copyright for your use in your classes.  

PLEASE BE COURTEOUS and leave any watermark or author attribution on the content you reproduce.

VISIT the ECG Guru on FaceBook and YouTube.

 

Instructors' Collection ECG of the WEEK, May 26, 2015 __ Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

Tue, 05/26/2015 - 16:36 -- Dawn

This ECG shows voltage criteria for LVH (deep S waves V1-V3 and tall R waves V4 - V6). There are many criteria in use for determining LVH, but probably the most commonly used is the Sokolow-Lyon criteria.  This criteria says that if the voltage of the S wave in V1 PLUS the tallest R wave of V4, V5, and V6 equals 35 mm or more, the criteria are sufficient for LVH.

In order to diagnose LVH from the ECG, we must also show repolarization abnormalities, called the "strain pattern".  This is seen in sloping ST depressions in all leads with upright QRS complexes.  There will also be slight ST elevations (reciprocal to the depressions) in leads with negative QRSs.  Chest xray and echocardiogram are important in confirming the extent of the left ventricular enlargement. 

The axis of this ECG is not typical of LVH, as it is normal.  LVH usually has a left axis deviation.   In this ECG, Lead aVL appears to have a pathological Q wave.  Possible high lateral damage in the past has skewed the axis downward. The wide p waves in Lead II and the biphasic p waves in V1 may also indicate left atrial strain, a common finding with LVH, called "P mitrale".

Are You New to Laddergrams?

Fri, 02/20/2015 - 22:34 -- Dawn

A laddergram is a diagram of conduction through the heart, presented in a minimum of three tiers, one for the atria, one for the AV junction, and one for the ventricles.  Laddergrams are very useful for presenting and testing your theory of a dysrhythmia.  Instructors often use them to illustrate complex dysrhythmia mechanisms.  

If you don't yet have experience in using laddergrams, go to this LINK to find a short PowerPoint presentation that will give you the basics to get started.  Be careful - it can be a bit addicting to construct laddergrams, like working a puzzle.  If you want to use laddergrams to teach your students, this PowerPoint presentation can help you introduce them to the concept.  

Our thanks to Jason Roediger, ECG Guru and dysrhythmia expert, for the laddergram depicted here, and the many LADDERGRAMS featured in his blog posts on this site  to see the discussion accompanying this ECG, go to this LINK  (Warning: this is an ECG Challenge, which is advanced material)  

 “For another step-by-step review from Dr. Ken Grauer on How to Draw a Laddergram - Please check out Dr. Ken Grauer’s ECG Blog #69 - GO TO - http://tinyurl.com/KG-Blog-69

 

ECG Guru Ads - Products and Services of Interest to our Members

 

 

1924:  Willem Einthoven wins the Nobel prize for inventing the electrocardiograph.


ARE YOU INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING ON THE ECGGURU?  WE OFFER LIMITED ADVERTISING SPACE TO PRODUCTS OR SERVICES THAT WOULD BE BENEFICIAL TO OUR MEMBERS. CONTACT THE ECG GURU AT INFO@ECGGURU.COM

 

 

Subscribe to ECG Guru - Instructor Resources RSS